Coin Collecting


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Susan B. Anthony Dollar
(1979-1981)(1999)
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Susan Brownell Anthony (1820-1906) a pioneer of women's rights. It was the first time a woman, other than a mythical figure, had appeared on a circulating United States coin.
The suffragist's portrait on the obverse was a new design; however, the reverse was the same design used on the Eisenhower Dollar the year before. Both the obverse and the reverse of the coin were designed by Chief Engraver Frank Gasparro. His initials FG appear below the portrait and the eagle.
The coin weighs 8.1 grams and has a diameter of 26.50 mm. These dollars cannot be called 'silver dollars' as they are composed of two outer layers of a copper-nickel alloy (75% copper, 25% nickel) bonded to an inner core of pure copper.
The Anthony dollar failed to gain widespread public acceptance and was discontinued in 1981. Coins dated 1981 were never released for circulation - they were available in Proof Sets and Uncirculated Sets only. A total of 868,511,516 Anthony Dollars were produced.
The Susan B. Anthony Dollar was initially produced for three years 1979 to 1981. The Susan B. Anthony Dollar was again struck in 1999. This new striking was due to the demand for dollar coins by both the U.S. Postal Service, who use them in their vending machines, and by casinos, who use them for dollar slot machines.

Terms and Mint Marks

BU (Brilliant Uncirculated): A strictly uncirculated coin with attractive mint luster but noticeable detracting contact marks or minor blemishes.
PRF (Proof Edition): The term "Proof" refers to a method of manufacture which produces a superior quality coin. Proofs are struck on specially prepared planchets using highly polished dies. They are struck multiple times at low speed and are made expressly for collectors in Proof Sets. Modern Proof coins are easily identified by their mirror-like finish and frosted features.
T1/T2: The 1979 Type 1 Dollar has a "filled S" which was hard to read. The die was re-cut creating the Type 2 or "clear S." Similarly, in 1981, the die was re-cut creating a Type 1 (filled S) and a Type 2 (clear S).
Far Date/Near Date: The first Anthony Dollars produced in 1979 had a narrow rim on the obverse so the date was farther from the rim, hence the term Far Date. Late in the year, the obverse was modified to widen the rim. These modified Near Date dollars are more scarce than the Far Dates because the dies were changed to strike the 1980 dollars shortly after the rim modification. All subsequent issues have the wide rim.
The Anthony Dollars were stuck in Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco. The mint mark, either P, D, or S, appears slightly above Anthony's right shoulder.

Facts and Figures:

Obverse Design Susan B. Anthony
Reverse Design Apollo 11 Insignia, Eagle
Mintage years 1979-1981,1999
Mints Philadelphia (P), Denver (D), San Francisco (S); Mint mark located behind Ms. Anthony's right shoulder
Composition Cupro-Nickel Clad
Outer layers: 75% Cu, 25% Ni
Inner core: 100% pure copper
Overall Composition: 87.5% copper; 12.5 % nickel
Edge Reeded (133 reeds)
Weight 8.1 grams
Diameter 26.5mm (1.04")
Thickness 2.00mm
Obverse Designer Frank Gasparro; Initials "FG" located below Ms. Anthony's left shoulder
Reverse Designer:

Frank Gasparro

COMMENTS: The Susan B. Anthony Dollar Act was signed into law by President Jimmy Carter on October 10, 1978. Production began in Philadelphia on December 13, 1978, in Denver on January 9, 1979, and in San Francisco on February 2, 1979. The release date was July 2, 1979. The Anthony Dollar is the first circulating U.S. coin to feature a real woman. The "P" mint mark was used on a coin for only the second time in U.S. coinage history, the first time being on the War Nickels of 1942-1945. The 1999-P proof Anthony Dollar, along with the 1942-P 5¢, are the only two proof coins to bear a "P" mint mark. The Anthony Dollar also has the distinction of having the longest period of time between being struck. It was struck in 1981 and then not struck again until 1999, a lapse of 18 years. The previous record was 17 years with the Morgan Dollar which was struck in 1904 and then not again until 1921.
NOTE: The Peace Dollar was struck in 1935 and then again in 1964 (29 years). However, the 1964 pieces were never issued and supposedly all were destroyed.


Mintage Figures &
What Makes Up A Set of Susan B. Anthony Dollars

Below are the mintage figures for all Susan B. Anthony Dollars struck by the United States Mint. Also included in the list are the major varieties. What coins exactly make up a "complete" set is ALWAYS up to the individual collector. Some may collect one of every year and from every mint struck. Others will add major varieties, while some want every die variety known for the series no matter how minor. Some may simply collect just one of each year minted, yet others, such as myself, collect anything and everything related to the particular coin. The coins in the list below marked with an asterisk (*) are considered part of a conventional set of Susan B. Anthony Dollars.

Year/
Mintmark

Type

Mintage Total

Comments

*1979-P

Unc.

360,222,000

Narrow Border Variety

*1979-P

Unc.

Inc. Above

Wide Border Variety

*1979-D

Unc.

288,015,744

 

*1979-S

Unc.

109,576,000

 

*1979-S

Proof

3,677,175

Type 1 Mintmark

*1979-S

Proof

Inc. Above

Type 2 Mintmark 

*1980-P

Unc.

27,610,000

 

*1980-D

Unc.

41,628,708

 

*1980-S

Unc.

20,422,000

 

*1980-S

Proof

3,554,806

 

*1981-P

Unc.

3,000,000

Released only in 1981 Mint Sets

*1981-D

Unc.

3,250,000

Released only in 1981 Mint Sets

*1981-S

Unc.

3,492,000

Released only in 1981 Mint Sets

*1981-S

Proof

4,063,083

Type 1 Mintmark

*1981-S

Proof

Inc. Above

Type 2 Mintmark

*1999-P

Unc.

29,592,000

Mintage resumed after 18 years,
a record for U.S. coins

*1999-D

Unc.

11,776,000

 

*1999-P

Proof

Estimated
750,000

Only the 2nd proof coin in U.S. history to bear a "P" mint mark. The other: 1942-P 5¢


THE PCGS SET REGISTRY

Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) lists the finest coin sets in existence today, and of all time as graded by them. Click on the links below to view the finest Susan B. Anthony Dollar lists.

Susan B. Anthony Dollars Circulation Strikes
(1979-1981, 1999)

Susan B. Anthony Dollars
Proof (1979-1981, 1999)


SUSAN B. ANTHONY DOLLAR VARIETIES


NARROW RIM VARIETY


WIDE RIM VARIETY

1979-P Wide and Narrow Rim: These varieties are sometimes refered to as "Far Date" and "Near Date". This is actually inaccurate as the date was not moved, but instead the border was widened. The Mint began striking the 1979-P SBA Dollars with the "narrow rim". Late in 1979 the border was widened to give the coin a more aesthetic appearance. The "narrow rim" variety is found on all 1979 dollars from all of the mints. The 1979 "wide rim" variety can only be found on the "P" mint issues. The "wide rim" variety was used for the remainder of the series. According to information provided by George E. Hunter, the Assistant Director of Technology for the U.S. Mint at the time, there were 643 "wide rim" dies used at the Philadelphia Mint in 1979. With an estimated 250,000 strikes per die, that would give a mintage of 160,750,000 1979-P "Wide Rim" Susan B. Anthony Dollars, or nearly 45% of all 1979-P Anthony Dollars minted.


1979-S "Type-1" This is the Mint Mark some suggest was placed in use as early as 1968.  It was also used for all business strike 1979-S Susan B. Anthony dollars and the majority or the proof coin mintages for all denominations in 1979.  It is characterized by an indistinct to almost blob-like appearance (extremely blob-like on the later stages). It may come with or without clear fields or "attachments" within the center loops depending on the amount of punching pressure utilized to sink the image into the die and/or the amount of polishing the die receives.  This is the more common variety for the year.


1979-S PROOF
"TYPE 1" MINT MARK

   
1979-S "Type-2" This Mint mark was introduced in the later part of 1979 for proof coinage production (and referred to as Ty-2 for this year).   It exhibits large bulbous serifs and rounder center loops than found on the Ty-1.  In spite of the fact that this variety is frequently and inaccurately referred to as "Clear S", it may come with or without clear fields or "attachments" within the center loops depending on the amount of punching pressure utilized to sink the image into the die and/or the amount of polishing the die receives.  It does, however, have a greater tendency to be found with "clearer fields" within the loops than the Ty-1, but this is not a determining factor of type.


1979-S PROOF
"TYPE 2" MINT MARK



PROOF 1981-S "TYPE 1" MINT MARK

1981-S "Type-1" This is the same Mint mark as introduced in the later part of 1979 for proof coinage production (and referred to as Ty-2 for that year). (It is the first one used in 1981 and is thus designated Ty-1 for that year.) It exhibits smaller rounded serifs and more oval shaped center loops than found on the Ty-2. It may come with or without clear fields or "attachments" within the center loops depending on the amount of punching pressure utilized to sink the image into the die and/or the amount of polishing the die receives. This is the more common variety for the year.
   


PROOF 1981-S "TYPE 2" MINT MARK

1981-S "Type-2" This Mint mark was introduced in the later part of 1981 for proof coinage production (and referred to as Ty-2 for this year). It exhibits large bulbous serifs and rounder center loops than found on the Ty-1. In spite of the fact that this variety is frequently and inaccurately referred to as "Clear S", it may come with or without clear fields or "attachments" within the center loops depending on the amount of punching pressure utilized to sink the image into the die and/or the amo unt of polishing the die receives. It does, however, have a greater tendency to be found with "clearer fields" within the loops than the Ty-1 but this is not a determining factor of type.


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